"When these prejudicial stereotypes are applied to First Nations peoples of North America, what is “authentically Indian” becomes submerged and dehumanized by the “colonial mind set,” which promotes a “falsely superior [Anglo-American] ‘we’ versus [Indigenous] ‘them’ perspective.” According to Cornel Pewewardy, “The colonizer’s falsified stories have become universal truths to mainstream society and have reduced indigenous culture to a cartoon caricature. This distorted and manufactured reality is one of the most powerful shackles subjecting Indigenous Peoples. It distorts all indigenous experiences, past and present.” The result is miscommunication, misunderstanding, and “dysconscious racism,” a term for a type of racism that “unconsciously accepts dominant white norms and privileges.” Joyce E. King elaborates: “Dysconscious racism is an uncritical habit of mind (that is, perceptions, attitudes, assumptions and beliefs) that justifies inequity and exploitation by accepting the existing order of things as given. It involves identification with an ideological view point which admits no fundamentally alternative vision of society.” Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann state in their 1967 book, The Social Construction of Reality, “He who has the bigger stick has the better chance of imposing his definition of reality.” As was discussed in the introduction to the present book, writers, directors, and producers of television shows are primarily Euro-Americans who wield highly influential and enormous sticks."

Sierra S. Adare, "Indian" Stereotypes in TV Science Fiction: First Nations’ Voices Speak Out
@2 years ago with 40 notes
#Native Ameircan #Amerian Indian #NDN #First Nations #Native Indian #Red Indian #Indian Hat #Stereotypes #Racism 

"Even though we are in the twenty-first century, minorities still continue to face discrimination based on five-hundred-year-old characterizations. It may be a new millennium, but it’s already filled with very old stereotypes about the Indigenous population of this country."

Sierra S. Adare, "Indian" Stereotypes in TV Science Fiction: First Nations’ Voices Speak Out
@2 years ago with 24 notes
#Native American #Native American #NDN #Stereotypes #Racism #discrimination #Indian Hat #Native Indian #Red Indian 
adailyriot:

constant reblog for truth!

adailyriot:

constant reblog for truth!

(via rematiration-deactivated2013111)

@2 years ago with 102 notes

"Nothing is more American than the languages of her first people"

Ryan Wilson (via eclecticschmectic)

peoples*

(via eclecticschmectic-deactivated20)

@2 years ago with 40 notes
adailyriot:

This is the totem pole carved as a memorial to John T. Williams who was murdered in cold blood in broad day light by Seattle Police Officer Burke in the middle of a Seattle intersection. This will be the first Totem Pole raised in Seattle in over 40 years.
It will be raised at the Seattle Center on February 27, 2012.
To learn more and/or support this project, please visit either their facebook page, or the project’s website.

adailyriot:

This is the totem pole carved as a memorial to John T. Williams who was murdered in cold blood in broad day light by Seattle Police Officer Burke in the middle of a Seattle intersection. This will be the first Totem Pole raised in Seattle in over 40 years.

It will be raised at the Seattle Center on February 27, 2012.

To learn more and/or support this project, please visit either their facebook page, or the project’s website.

(via rematiration-deactivated2013111)

@2 years ago with 218 notes

"[Stereotypes] are factually incorrect; they are products of a “faulty” or illogical thought process; they are characterized as inordinate rigidity; they are derived from an inadequate basis of acquisition, such as hearsay they are consensual beliefs within a culture, perhaps implying a lack of individual thought; they serve a rationalization function for ethnic prejudice; they ascribe to racial inheritance that which may be cultural acquisition and they serve as justification for prejudicial or discriminatory social practices."

Sierra S. Adare, "Indian" Stereotypes in TV Science Fiction: First Nations’ Voices Speak Out
@2 years ago with 237 notes
#Native American #American Indian #NDN #Stereotypes #Racism #Native Indian #Red Indian 

Native Women in Film & TV 

cingarkaq:

To date there have only been 4 contemporary American Indian women stories ever produced in film history in the United States, they are: “A Girl Called Hatter Fox” C.B.S. 1977 – starring Joanelle Romero (this was the first contemporary American Indian Women story produced); “Lakota Woman” Ted Turner TNT 1994 starring Irene Bedard; “Naturally Native” in 1998 starring Valerie Redhorse; and “Imprint” in 2007 starring Tonantzin Carmelo.

the sad thing is, Lakota Woman, if it was based off the book, was written by a non-native and filled with inaccurate information and stereotypes. Anyone who has read that book or plans to, ought to be made aware of that fact.

@2 years ago with 12 notes

digatisdi:

coffeeandcortexiphan:

shes2rez4ubro:

Native Pickup lines LAH

  • damn baby you are so hot my tipi is growing a second story
  • dont worry, nobody’s here, they’re all out playing bingo right now
  • the first time i saw you was like first time winning the jackpot at bingo: unforgettable
  • you are like like the perfect indian taco: thick on the bottom and light on the top
  • hey, it took me 2 months of percap checks to go on this date with you
  • hey girl, you’re a pretty good jingle dancer. How bout you come back to my place and I’ll show you what the fancy dance is all about
  • I’ve been on many hunting trips you know, and by far you’re the best catch
  • when i first saw you i thought you were cheyenne, because I’ve been told they’re the most beautiful natives, but I was wrong
  • If i were a chief, you would be my personal assistant
  • damn girl, you got legs like a mustang
  • damn baby, your body’s so hot, i wanna pour powdered milk all over and lick it off
  • hey girl, i ain’t no 2 minutes, i go by indian time
  • hey girl, you had me at the 49 party
  • when my grandfather saw you, he said heya heya hot stuff, I knew I had to snag you right there
  • damn baby, when you were jingle dancing out there, i had to grab my mother’s shawl and put it on my lap
  • damn baby, you’re so soft down there, feels like rabbit skin
  • I had to gather all these beer cans to go on this date with you
  • yeah baby, why dont you come back to my place, and i’ll show you what the tomahawk chuck is all about
  • when i found this eagle feather, i gave it to you. when i saw these wildflowers, i picked them for you. when i caught this salmon, we ate it together. and when I found this condom, i knew we were going to have sex tonight
  • damn girl you’re so hot, you’re making me speak my native tongue
  • hey no worries, we’re second cousins you know
  • when I first saw you, my heart was beating like a fancydance song

Can I just reblog this forever?

Once I was talking about how I try to defy stereotypes about my race and this attractive guy joined in the conversation and he was very supportive and I wanted to use a pickup line and all I could think of was, “The first time I saw you was like first time winning the jackpot at bingo: unforgettable” so I didn’t say anything.

(via ishkwaakiiwan)

@2 years ago with 108 notes

"Granted, certain ceremonies conducted at pow wows are deeply significant to First Nations peoples and are very religious in nature. Pow wows, however, are social gatherings and, unfortunately, the congregation spot for racism in one of its worst forms -the anthropologist. Anthropologists, in broad terms, need not be professionals but simply those who feel they have the right to steal the images of First Nations individuals in any form at any time -the obnoxious photographers who believe they have an absolute entitlement to take anybody’s picture even after the individual tells them no. As Richard Hill, a Mohawk artist, has remarked: “Nearly all Indians have been asked to ‘pose’ for a visitor’s camera, and the visitor leaves with his personal image of ‘real, live Indians.’ …Stories about White photographers entered tribal oral histories and the camera became the latest weapon to be used against Indians…. The camera was an intrusion on Indian life. The photographs were taken for outside interests, by outside people, outside of the needs of Indians themselves."

Sierra S. Adare, "Indian" Stereotypes in TV Science Fiction: First Nations’ Voices Speak Out
@2 years ago with 55 notes
#Native American #American Indian #First Nations #NDN #Native Indian #Red Indian #Stereotyping #cameras #pow wow #anthropologist #photography 

"If people are genuinely interested in honoring Indians, try getting your government to live up to the more than 400 treaties it signed with our nations. Try respecting our religious freedom which has been repeatedly denied in federal courts. Try stopping the ongoing theft of Indian water and other natural resources. Try reversing your colonial process that relegates us to the most impoverished, polluted, and desperate conditions in this country… Try understanding that the mascot issue is only the tip of a very huge problem of continuing racism against American Indians. Then maybe your [“honors”] will mean something. Until then, it’s just so much superficial, hypocritical puffery. People should remember that an honor isn’t born when it parts the honorer’s lips, it is born when it is accepted in the honoree’s ear."

Glenn T. Morris, Colorado AIM, 1992 (via adailyriot

)

(via rematiration-deactivated2013111)

@2 years ago with 493 notes